Legal Aid protects your access to public benefits, including healthcare, cash assistance, food assistance and disability benefits.

In addition to representing individual clients in public benefits cases, Legal Aid works to improve statewide policies and procedures, making public benefits more accessible to all Northeast Ohioans.

Public Benefits Matters We Handle:

  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • Alien Emergency Medical Assistance (AEMA)
  • Ohio Works First (OWF-cash assistance)
  • Food Stamps
  • Childcare Vouchers
  • Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
  • Veteran’s Benefits

FAQs

My Ohio Works First (OWF-cash assistance), food stamps, Medicaid, or childcare vouchers have been terminated or lowered. What do I do? Close

If you think the decision was wrong, ask for a state hearing right away. If you ask for a hearing within 15 days of the date of the termination notice, your benefits will not stop or be lowered before the state hearing.

You have 90 days from the date of the notice to ask for a state hearing, although requests made after 15 days will not preserve your benefits.

You may ask for a state hearing using any of the following methods:

  • Fill out and mail the “State Hearing Request” attached to your termination notice
  • Fill out and fax the “State Hearing Request” to 614-728-9574
  • Call the ODJFS Consumer Access Line at 1-866-635-3748 (1-866-ODJFS-4U)
  • Email the ODJFS Bureau of State Hearings at bsh@odjfs.state.oh.us

Next Steps

Contact Legal Aid right away.

Other Resources

  • Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services
  • Cuyahoga County Jobs and Family Services
  • Lorain County Jobs and Family Services
  • Lake County Jobs and Family Services
  • Geauga County Jobs and Family Services
  • Ashtabula County Jobs and Family Services
  • My Ohio Works First (OWF-cash assistance) was terminated because I am over the 36-month time limit. What do I do? Close

    You may ask for an extension of your OWF cash assistance if you can show a hardship. Some examples of hardship are taking care of a sick family member, temporary inability to work because of domestic violence, and homelessness.

    You may ask your caseworker for an extension because of this hardship. If your request for an extension is denied or ignored, you may ask for a State Hearing by using any of the following methods:

    • Fill out and mail the “State Hearing Request” attached to your termination notice
    • Fill out and fax the “State Hearing Request” to 614-728-9574
    • Call the ODJFS Consumer Access Line at 1-866-635-3748 (1-866-ODJFS-4U)
    • Email the ODJFS Bureau of State Hearings at bsh@odjfs.state.oh.us

    Next Steps

    If your request for a hardship extension is denied and you disagree with this decision, contact Legal Aid right away.

    Other Resources

  • Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services
  • Cuyahoga County Jobs and Family Services
  • Lorain County Jobs and Family Services
  • Lake County Jobs and Family Services
  • Geauga County Jobs and Family Services
  • Ashtabula County Jobs and Family Services
  • I applied for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and was denied. What do I do? Close

    If you think you are disabled, appeal the decision right away. You have 60 days to appeal the decision. You may appeal by any of the following methods:

    • Go to your local Social Security Office
    • Call your local Social Security Office
    • Call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213
    • Visit the Social Security Administration website at www.ssa.gov

    Next Steps

    Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association
    Lawyer Referral Service
    (216) 696-3532

    Other Resources

    Social Security Administration

    I am low-income and am involved in a civil case. Is there a way to reduce or eliminate fees? Close

    When a person wants to file a civil case, the court requires that person to pay a filing fee to start the legal process.   Also, a person who is a party to a case and wants to ask the court to do something by filing a “motion” or a “counterclaim” must also pay a fee.   In order to fully participate in a legal proceeding, courts often require payment of many different costs and fees.

    In many situations, you can file your documents in court without payment or with a lower payment if you also file a “poverty affidavit.”   A poverty affidavit is a written, sworn statement that you are low income and do not have enough money to pay the fees.   You will need to list your income, assets and dependents on the affidavit.   Once you file a poverty affidavit in a case, the clerk will either not charge you any money or will only charge a small fraction of the normal fee to file most other documents in the same case.

    You can complete a poverty affidavit at The Legal Aid Society of Cleveland, even if you are not represented by an attorney from Legal Aid.   If you need a poverty affidavit, go to any Legal Aid office during normal business hours (note recent changes) and request the form from the receptionist.   Be sure you also have the form notarized, which Legal Aid can do as well.   You will need photo identification to have the poverty affidavit notarized.

    After you complete a poverty affidavit, you must take it to the clerk of courts where your case is being heard.   The poverty affidavit will only apply to that specific case.   If you have another case at the same or a later time, you will need a second poverty affidavit.   Also, in Ohio, the poverty affidavit allows you to file documents in a case without payment or with lesser payment but does not eliminate all fees.   At the end of the case, you might still be responsible for some fees such as court costs.

    This article was written by Legal Aid attorney Anne Sweeney and appeared in The Alert: Volume 29, Issue 1. Click here to read the full issue.

    When is a child eligible for SSI? Close

    A child under the age of 18 who has a physical or mental disability may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) if the family is financially eligible.   SSI is a cash assistance program to help low income families with expenses that occur when providing for children with special needs.     For example, such parents must pay for transportation to medical appointments, medications, and therapy.   Additionally, parents with disabled children more commonly have to miss work to take their children to doctors, therapists, school conferences, and other care-giving activities.   Children’s SSI provides additional income to families in order for children to receive quality health care while remaining in their own home.

    When applying for SSI, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will look at a child’s functioning in six areas or “domains.”   The domains are (1) acquiring and using information; (2) attending and completing tasks; (3) interacting and relating with others; (4) moving about and manipulating objects; (5) caring for yourself; and (6) health and physical well-being. If a child has a severe problem in one domain or a “marked” problem in two domains (“marked” means less than severe and more than moderate), then the child’s condition should be considered disabling.   A child with a disabling condition qualifies for SSI.

    A person interested in filing an application for a child to receive SSI should call the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213 or visit a local Social Security Office.   They will help you fill out the appropriate forms. Applications for child SSI can also be completed online at www.ssa.gov.   In addition to the application, SSA will ask for detailed information about the medical condition of the child.   SSA will also ask permission to look at his or her school and medical records. Bring any records related to the child’s special needs to your appointment at SSA.

    Legal Aid does not help file applications for SSI, but if you believe a child’s SSI benefits have been wrongfully denied or terminated, please call Legal Aid at 1-888-817-3777 to find out if you are eligible for assistance.

    This article was written by Legal Aid Managing Attorney Davida Dodson and appeared in The Alert: Volume 29, Issue 3. Click here to read the full issue.

    How Can I Get Health Coverage? Close

    Almost everyone can get health insurance now under the Affordable Care Act (or ObamaCare).

    • In Ohio, people with income below 138% of the federal poverty level (about $1,321 per month for an individual and about $2,708 per month for a family of 4) are eligible for free health care coverage through Medicaid.
    • You can apply for Medicaid at www.benefits.ohio.gov even if you have been denied in the past. You can also apply by phone (1-800-324-8680) or in person at your local County Department of Job and Family Services office.
    • If you do not qualify for Medicaid, you can apply for health care coverage through The Marketplace. You can apply online at www.HealthCare.gov or you can call 1-800-318-2596. The deadline to apply for 2014 coverage through the Marketplace is March 31, 2014.
    • If your income is 100% to 400% of federal poverty level you will be eligible for tax credits to reduce the cost of health care coverage purchased through the Marketplace.
    • If you need help with health care information or applications, visit www.ohioforhealth.org or call 1-800-648-1176.
    • If you are denied Medicaid by the county or tax credits by the Marketplace, Legal Aid may be able to help you. Call Legal Aid intake at 1-888-817-3777.

      What are the new work requirements for Food Stamps? Close

      Beginning January 1, 2014, your County Department of Job and Family Services will start enforcing the new work requirements for food stamps for “able bodied adults without dependents.” These individuals will now be limited to receiving benefits for 3 months in any 36-month period unless work 80 hours per month or participate in the county’s work experience program. But individuals can keep getting Food Stamps without any limits and without any work requirement if they qualify for an exemption. Individuals are exempt if they are:

      • 17 or younger or older than 50
      • Receiving benefits in a household with someone 17 years old or younger
      • Receiving OWF or disability benefits
      • Applying for or receiving SSI or UC
      • Students enrolled at least half-time in school or training program
      • Pregnant
      • Responsible for the care of an incapacitated person they live with
      • Determined to be mentally or physically unfit for employment
      • Participating in a drug or alcohol treatment or rehabilitation program

      If you believe you should be exempt from the new work requirement, provide proof of your exemption to your Food Stamp caseworker at your County Department of Job and Family Services immediately. Keep a copy of the proof you provide and write the date you give it to your worker. If you are denied an exemption or if your Food Stamp caseworker threatens to stop your Food Stamps, Legal Aid may be able to help you. Call Legal Aid intake at 1-888-817-3777.

      My Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) benefits ended – what should I do? Close

      Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) benefits ended but keep filing claims. The EUC program is a temporary program that provides additional benefits to unemployed workers who have used up their maximum 26 weeks of regular UC benefits. It ended on December 28, 2013, meaning no EUC payments will be issued for weeks of unemployment after December 28. But, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services recommends claimants continue filing weekly claims for EUC benefits in case the program is renewed in 2014. Claimants should file online at https://unemployment.ohio.gov or by calling 1-866-962-4064 between 8 am and 5pm, Monday through Friday. For the most current information, visit https://unemployment.ohio.gov.

      The Health Insurance Marketplace deadline is 3/31/14 – are there exceptions? Close

      People who are not eligible for Medicaid and who do not have health insurance can enroll in The Marketplace until March 31, 2014.  Anyone who experiences a qualifying life event (moving to a new state, getting married, having a child or losing health coverage) can get a special enrollment period after March 31.  Also, consumers who tried to enroll but could not complete their application before March 31 will still be able to sign up for coverage.  Finally, special enrollment periods may be granted to people who could not complete enrollment despite trying to do so through no fault of their own.  For example, victims of domestic violence and people whose Medicaid applications were denied but whose accounts had not been transferred to the Marketplace by March 31.

      Remember, most people must have health coverage in 2014 or pay a small fee.  People eligible for Medicaid may continue to apply at www.benefits.ohio.gov.  If a person is denied Medicaid by the county or tax credits by the Marketplace, they can apply for help from Legal Aid by calling 216-687-1900 or 1-888-817-3777.

      What is MyCare Ohio? Close

      MyCare Ohio plans take effect May 1, 2014 for people enrolled in BOTH Medicaid and Medicare.

      MyCare Ohio is a new managed care pilot program for people who have both Medicaid and Medicare in 29 Ohio counties (including Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake and Lorain – not Ashtabula).

      Individuals receiving Medicaid services through the following programs will be part of MyCare Ohio:  Assisted Living Waiver, Behavioral Health (alcohol or drug treatment, mental health care), Ohio Home Care / Transitions Carve-Out, Nursing Home Residents, Passport, and Community Medicaid.  The three plans available to consumers are Buckeye, CareSource or UnitedHealthCare.

      Consumers who have not selected a plan, or who want to change plans, should call the Ohio Medicaid Consumer Hotline at 1-800-324-8680. For more information click here for a flyer and visit www.ohiomh.com/MyCareOhio.

      Brochures

      Do You Need Health Insurance? Learn about free or reduced cost health care.
      Do You Need Health Insurance?  Sign up NOW for free
      What You Need to Know About Unemployment Benefits
      Are you recently unemployed? You can receive unemployment compensation benefits
      Did Your “OWF” Payments Stop Because of Time Limits?
      You may be able to get more OWF cash assistance
      Your SS, SSI, Welfare, Pension and Other Funds May Be Protected from Your Creditor’s Reach
      If you owe money and your creditor went to court
      Social Security Cut? Maybe We Can Help!
      If you are a low-income person and get the IRS

      Self Help

      Do you need to file papers in court but cannot afford the fees?
      You might be able to reduce or avoid paying the

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